VW's imperialist enterprise in the media sphere

Dieselgate : and the winner is...

This November, Volkswagen's offensive in the electrical vehicle resulted in an impressive series of announcements and statements by the group's top executives, who seem to want to convince everyone that the inevitable move towards battery-powered electric vehicles is underway and that Volkswagen is the most ready of all manufacturers to lead this change.
 
There is undoubtedly a "Coué method" dimension here that leads managers, afraid of the risks they take, to want to convince themselves, their teams and customers that the battery-powered EV is the right choice.
Above all, there is obviously a very political will to impose a global standard and to create competitive rules of the game for the automotive industry, which will be all the easier for Volkswagen to respect as they will have been largely designed around its convictions and proposals.
 
One of the signs of this political work was given when Angela Merkel, at the beginning of the month, honoured the invitation of the group's leaders to attend the launch of the ID3 assemby plant at the Zwickau plant in eastern Saxony.
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Thanks to ageing and deindustrialisation, the Ile de France is painted green

Bernard Jullien is not cheering (source AFP).
The first results in the latest EGT (Enquête Globale Transports = Global Transport Survey) conducted by Île-de-France Mobilités, formerly known as STIF (Syndicat des transports d'Île de France, the state run transportation authority recently devoluted to the region), are now available.
[Expectations were high since the reduction of the car footprint has become the official policy not only of the socialist mayor of Paris Hidalgo but also now to her moderately conservative rival governing the region].
 
They reveal that the region chaired by Valérie Pécresse is where it was expected to be: compared to 2010 (date of the last EGT), the growth in commuting - following that of the population - was expected to be around 7% by 2020 and, to reduce GHG emissions linked to transport by 20%, it was necessary, according to Airparif's calculation, for car and two-wheel motorised travel to fall by 2%.
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Toyota et Honda : different but strong

Looks like a no-deal
This November, we receive the financial results of Japanese automakers for the first half of their fiscal year, which ends at the end of March. Awaiting of Nissan, which will only be made public this week, we can look at those of Toyota and Honda, which already reveal the unequal exposure of Japanese carmakers to the decline in global demand that is now taking shape.
 
From this point of view, Toyota impresses by posting increasing volumes, sales and results.
Toyota sold 4.64 million vehicles from April to September, 220,000 more than last year. Its turnover increased by 600 billion yen (almost 5 billion euros), i.e. by 4%, and its operating income by 140 billion yen (1.16 billion euros, +11%). Its operating margin was 8.6% of turnover for the first half of the previous year, compared to 9.2% for the first six months of 2020.
 
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PSA-FCA: Sergio's ghost is hovering over the deal

Some in the industry need a haircut

As the exact terms of the deal being negotiated and the reactions of the markets become clearer, the scope of this 50-50 appears a bit different from "parity". Indeed, the financial community is calculating, on the basis of the respective valuations of the two groups before the announcement of the project and the operations that will be carried out before the deal, that we would rather be at 60-40 for the benefit of PSA, and that PSA therefore is agrees for the deal to be made at a significant sacrifice. read more

Behind the financial results: the challenge of the pay out policy to shareholders

Payout_policy_2006-15.jpg

As we are informed in late October of the financial results for the third quarter of 2019 of the automotive groups, a rather difficult year 2019 is looming for most manufacturers and everything suggests that things will not improve in 2020: a large majority of markets are on a downward trend and it is imperative to continue investing.
 
Investing for a carmaker means both feeding the "business as usual" by regularly renewing the products. It also means, of course, launching or developing in new fields by setting up in countries where it was not present, or not enough, by creating new brands or by developing R&D skills that were not its own until then.
In all these cases, there is a need to spend now and, in most cases, several years in a row, expecting future revenues that may or may not become a reality.
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Renault: getting out of the ostrich policy

La même scène vue autrement
As if to mark his difference and/or to highlight what might have opposed her to Thierry Bolloré (Renault's former CEO, recently laid off), Clotilde Delbos (appointed to replace him) began her interim period at the head office of the Renault group with a "profit warning": no, the return to positive cash flow in the second half of the year will not offset the €700 million negative cash flow of the first half; no, revenue will not be constant but will fall by 3 to 4% and the operating margin will be 5% rather than 6% as announced in July; no, the 2022 plan will not be implemented and it is urgent to redefine it so that everyone knows where he is going.
 
She did not just talk to the analysts. She also spoke on Tuesday in a video for employees to tell them that the "Drive the Future" plan had to be taken up again because the market has changed over the past two years and that "unfortunately, the situation did not improve during the summer" and requires that the strategy be adjusted to "get Renault back on track".
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Bolloré's lay-off: the way he was managing Renault has weighed in the decision than his links with Ghosn

Il y a un an, il y a un siècle...

The show goes on and the last episode was the brutal eviction of Thierry Bolloré (Renault's CEO) on Friday.
 
This is willingly commented on as the counterpart to Saikawa's which would have been desired by the Nissans and - as some presume - agreed by Jean-Dominique Senard (Renault's Chairman) that the trio of leadership candidates should be put in the order he wanted to see prevail.
The government and the agency of state shareholdings ("APE3: Agence des Participations de l'Etat) which, after having wished for the Renault-Nissan merger and having favourably considered the Renault-FCA operation, seem to have finally understood since the beginning of June that the relaunch of the Alliance should be the priority given to J.-D. Senard would have validated the option. The undertaking would therefore mainly be a process of "de-ghosnisation" of the top management of the two companies necessary for a new start.
 
If this interpretation contains some truth, it is probably a little short, however.
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Louis Schweitzer / An experienced eye on the future of the car industry - Q&A / International Colloquium of Gerpisa 2019

Date: 
13/06/2019
Louis Schweitzer, former CEO of Renault
Emission / Séminaire / Colloque: 

Louis Schweitzer / Keynote Q&A / International Colloquium of Gerpisa 2019

Louis Schweitzer's Q&A after keynote speech at 2019 Gerpisa International Colloquium.

CNPA - UTP: an alliance for new mobilities to come out of infancy

20 years of public policies on mobilities in a nutshell

For decades, private and public transport have formed an irreconcilable couple, an irreconcilable opposition.
 
The former were expanding spontaneously, allowing urban sprawl, eating all the space and generating pollution and congestion.        
It was then considered - not without reason - that it was imperative to organise the "modal shift" by taxing the car, making parking difficult and expensive and organising congestion. Conversely, public transport deserved to be massively subsidised and to be a priority in the allocation of state and local authority public speding as well as in the allocation of space. Through hard work, this dichotomous approach has finally achieved some success in major cities where the car has actually backed down.
However, due to the inability of these and other public policies (land and development) to contain urban land price growth and/or to match employment and residential location, urban sprawl has continued, mobility needs have increased, public transport has not been able to cover them, the number of vehicles per household has continued to increase and there are now two deadlocks.
 
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Samuel Klebaner / Procès Dieselgate : est-ce la fin de l’âge d’or de l’automobile allemande ? / France Culture

Date: 
01/10/2019
Intervenant/s: 
Emission / Séminaire / Colloque: 

Samuel Klebaner / La question du jour / France Culture

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